The Raw Milk Debate Rages On--But Is Raw Milk Worth Its Higher Cost?

Categories: Cooking!
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Dave Lieberman
It seems not to be possible to have a reasoned discussion about raw milk. For such a minor part of people's everyday lives, it inspires bitter argument.

Detractors of the raw milk movement, including pretty much every food safety organization you've ever heard of, say that food-borne illness spikes when raw milk is consumed widely and that only pasteurization can make our children safe.

Supporters of the movement have a litany of health benefits they claim raw milk provides, including better digestion, a reduction in food allergies, and even a decline in obesity. They point out routinely that Europeans have raw milk available to them with nearly no ill effects.

Raw milk is illegal in most of the United States. In California, it's permitted to be sold only from dairies that have been inspected by the California Department of Food and Agriculture; this is why Rawesome was raided. Not only is raw milk typically illegal, but products made from it must be aged in order to be sold, which is why you can't bring back that gooey Brie de Meaux from France you fell in love with.

I'm not strongly on either side of the debate; there are plenty of examples of nations living happily and healthily without pasteurization, but a milk-related increase in obesity is probably due to the fact that "a glass of milk" has gone from a cup to nearly two cups in the last thirty years. I only care if it tastes good.

I bought my raw milk and raw cream at the Saturday morning farmers market in Orange, from the Organic Pastures booth. Organic Pastures-brand milk comes from a CDFA-compliant dairy, so it's completely legal. It's nearly twice the price of regular milk at $7 a gallon, so the bar is high.

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Dave Lieberman

I brought it home and decided to have a small glass by itself. There was a frisson of excitement as I took a sip. I'm not sure what I expected--I've certainly drunk my fair share of raw milk both directly from the cow and bought in stores in Europe--but it was, after all, just a glass of milk. The taste was only slightly different from standard milk, a bit grassier--something it had in common with pasteurized, organic milk. I made some ricotta and let it drain longer than usual, and it was slightly better than ricotta made with standard milk, but not enough to justify the price.

Where the difference was hugely noticeable was in the cream. The cream was far more floral-tasting than even pasteurized organic cream. It made amazing whipped cream for berry parfaits, so I decided to take the rest of it and culture it. I mixed a cup of the cream with two tablespoons of organic (but pasteurized) buttermilk and let it sit, covered, on the counter overnight.

In the morning I had crème fraîche the likes of which I haven't had since my last trip to Normandy--but I took it further and whipped the crème fraîche into butter with a pinch of salt. It was outstanding, just as good as the Isigny Ste.-Mère butter that's the pride of French chefs.

Is it worth buying raw milk? I don't know; I don't think so. Is it worth buying raw cream? Absolutely, without a doubt.

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Roger Bird
Roger Bird

It is up to the consumer to decide whether raw milk is worth it.  This is called freedom, a word that you might not be familiar with.  My boy was healed of his allergies with raw milk, but that is not the main point.  The main point is that it is not the business of reporters or government thugs to decide what we decide to eat or not.  Otherwise, all this talk about freedom and "land of the free" etc. is just a bunch of BS.

RobertWilliams
RobertWilliams

SMART METER PRIVACYVIOLATIONS.

1. Must-See 4-minute youtubevideo on Smart meters:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?f...

 

 

SMART METER HEALTH PROBLEMSAND CANCER.

 

2. The WORLD HEALTHORGANIZATION on May 31 2011 placed the Non-ionizing radiation coming fromWireless smart meters (and some other wireless devices) on the Class 2-BCarcinogen List.

http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-ce... 

 

3. The NATIONAL INSTITUTE OFHEALTH months ago (Feb 2011) found biological changes in the brain after onlyminutes of exposure to non-ionizing radiation.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/conte...

 

4. LABORATORY SCIENTISTS haveobserved
(1) Human Cell Damage
(2) DNA Chain Breaks
(3) Breaches in theBlood-Brain Barrier
from levels of non-ionizing radiation lower than emitted byWIRELESS Smart meters.

http://electromagnetichealth.o...

 

5. INSURANCE COMPANIES HiredIndependent Laboratory Scientists and these scientists also observed CellDamage and DNA Chain Breaks and now the Insurance Companies will NOT InsureLiability damage from Wireless Smart meters and other wireless devices.
TVVideo (3 minutes):

http://eon3emfblog.net/?p=382 

 


So shouldn’t installation ofWireless smart meters on people's homes STOP?

Because Cell Phone use andother devices are Voluntary and can be shut off at the user’s discretion, thatis a different issue.

 


6. WIRELESS SMART METERS –100 TIMES MORE RADIATION THAN CELL PHONES.
 Video Interview: Nuclear Scientist,Daniel Hirsch, (5 minutes):

http://stopsmartmeters.org/201...

7. WIRELESS SMART METERS –CANCER, NERVOUS SYSTEM DAMAGE, ADVERSE REPRODUCTION AFFECTS.
Video Interview:Dr. Carpenter, New York Public Health Department, Dean of Public Health, (2 minutes):

http://emfsafetynetwork.org/?p...

8. THE KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE INSTOCKHOLM (the University that gives the Nobel Prizes) ISSUES GLOBAL HEALTHWARNING AGAINST WIRELESS SMART METERS.
 2-page Press Release.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/4814...

9. RADIATION MEASURED FROMSMART METER MOUNTED ON A HOME (once active in the utility system) SHOWSRADIATION TRANSMISSION PULSES APPROXIMATELY ONCE EVERY FOUR SECONDS 24 HOURSPER DAY traveling through the bodies and brains of the inhabitants of thathome.
Youtube Video (6 minutes, 1st minute is sufficient):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

 

Note: many of the tests onnon-ionizing radiation (the type of radiation emitted by smart meters) havebeen done using instruments other than smart meters because smart meters haveonly been in people’s homes for a very short time.

 

But as a Wireless smart meteremits 100 times more radiation than a cell phone, it is not difficult toproject.  If a machine gun (smart meter) fires100 bullets in the same time that a pistol (cell phone) fires one bullet, it isnot difficult to project the harm that the machine gun can inflict, even if thetests were done with the pistol.

 

CUSTOMER UTILITY BILLS AFTER SMART METERS INSTALLED.

 

10. Skyrocketing Utility Billsafter installation

TV News Video (3 minutes)

http://www.bakersfieldnow.com/...

 

 

NATIONAL SECURITY RISKS DUE TO SMART METERS.

 

11. CIA Director James Woolseycalls Smart grid “Stupid” due to National Security problems caused by so-calledsmart meters.

News Video (1 minute)

http://www.energynow.com/video...

tb
tb

If the uninformed, nanny state "do-gooders" want to ban something - how about the corporate world's very profitable & nutitrionly devoid, over-processed & dead - "psuedo-foods?

Maybe they can start with Twinkies" & such, then get onto the Fast "food" industries very profitable, "food-like offerings."

lol.

RobertWilliams
RobertWilliams

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) facilitates the sales of pesticides by privileged insider chemical companies, quite similar to the way the Public Utility Commission facilitates the financial gains of PG$E at the expense of the people. CDFA eliminates quality food products like raw milk so that there will be no alternatives to the industry farming food that CDFA represents.  CDFA is like a dishonest cop.

MUST-SEE 4-minute youtube video on PG$E's so-called Smart meters:http://www.youtube.com/watch?f...

Drew
Drew

Well, if you make mozzerella or other cheeses at home it's pretty neccessary. I'd be pretty upset if it went away.

Drew
Drew

And yes I realize you can't technically make "mozzerella" with cow's milk..

20ftJesus
20ftJesus

Damn it!  You reminded me of the ONLY thing I miss from England -- Devonshire Clotted Cream.  Ah, the memories...little scone establishment next to the diary farm.  Mmm... 

Aed939
Aed939

The price of raw milk varies greatly from state to state depending on the regulations.  In California, the regulations require a larger fixed cost-investment of equipment, which only allows  fairly large operations to be viable.  In fact, only two licensed raw milk dairies currently exist in CA: McAfee's Organic Pastures and Claravale.  Unfortunately, CDFA is misapplying their authority on herdshares where there is no sale or distribution-for-subsequent-sale of milk.  Their jurisdiction is public health, and no milk goes on the public market in a herdshare.  They have no authority to interfere with a person's right to enjoy their own property.  As a result, the price of a gallon of milk in CA is relatively high.  In contrast, you can get raw milk in Pennsylvania for $4-$5/gallon.  That is a more reasonable price.  There are costs associated with doing things right--more land cost due to less cows per acre, etc., but compared to a CAFO airy, there are also savings--less energy costs, less feed costs for pastured cows, and less equipment costs.  So raw dairy is not necessarily greater cost per gallon than a "high-quality" pasteurized milk product.

PM
PM

I agree! I just moved from Amish country, PA, and was paying $3-5 per gallon for 100% Jersey (rich) raw milk. I've traded that for lovely weather here in inland SoCal. I love my raw milk (no, not a nutjob), but I'm not wealthy and cannot afford $15 per gallon for Organic Pastures milk. (BTW, the author misquoted the price at $7/gallon (they meant $7 per HALF gallon.). I appreciate what they do, but it's simply too expensive, especially since I consume about 6 gallons a month, between milk and making yogurt.

I am searching out other sources—Rawesome is still shut, I assume—and would appreciate any tips. Don't mind paying $8-10 per gallon, even. Just want good, rich raw milk.

Paul

Alan
Alan

My original interest in raw milk was strictly economic. I thought the food advocates for raw milk were a bit strange. However, after some study, what they said made sense. See "The Untold Story of Milk," by Ron Schmid. I've been drinking it almost five years. No colds or flu.

MayhemInTheHood
MayhemInTheHood

In a word: no. It's not worth it, since you can still get it legally. That's the sort of unintentionally funny part of the whole "debate". If a restaurant is shut down because they had no license, nor any health/safety inspections, you don't start clamoring "the government doesn't want us to have food!!! Hurrr durrrr!!". No, just do it legally, get your raw milk and shut up. Rawsome people were being rawtarded. 

That's not to discount any of the merits of raw milk. It's probably great stuff. The only reason I have an opinion on the matter, though, is that in my early 20's I worked at Whole Foods, as a "dairy specialist". The people that would buy/reserve all the raw milk we could get also happened to be the most batshit crazy customers I ran into there. Coincidence? Perhaps. But because of my experience there, for the past ten years, when I hear about raw dairy enthusiasts, I immediately think "insufferable nutjob". 

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