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Cup Noodles Museum Opens in Japan

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You Offend Me You Offend My Family

The Cup Noodles Museum opens today!  

And no, I don't mean my old dorm room closet. 

Forty years ago, Nissin Foods introduced to the world what would become a food staple of college students, stoners, kitchen klutzes and overworked cubicle rats. To celebrate the milestone, a noodle-lovers fantasyland has been unveiled in Yokohama, Japan. Yahoo! News has a cool slideshow. 

Some of the attractions, according to CNNGo

A make-your-own instant-noodle bar. You get to choose the flavor and ingredients, and design your own packaging.

History Cube, highlighting the journey of Cup Noodles from its original "Chikin Ramen" to today's oodles of flavors. 
 
Momofuku Theater, featuring CG movies about the life of Nissan Foods founder and instant-noodle inventor Momofuku Ando.   

Cup Noodles Park, a playground where kids become the noodles and pass through the production process, from creation to shipping.

In other words, my dream world. 

Japan also has the Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum and the Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum. All three are on my bucket list.   

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7 comments
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909Jeff
909Jeff

I drove past thier plant in Gardena this morning... I can still taste the flavoring that was thick in the air.  The EPA should investigate!

Wmblackstone
Wmblackstone

This is neither relevant nor local news. 

gustavoarellano
gustavoarellano

If, by "news", you mean all your comments, then you're right!

meemee
meemee

Hello,My "Nissin loving family" is visiting Osaka in November. Do you have any idea what's the diff between the 3 Museums you mentioned?  I'd like to choose between the 3.  Thanks!

Michelle Woo
Michelle Woo

Well, I can't say from experience, but I've always wanted to check out the Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum. It has a make-your-own instant noodle bar AND two underground levels created to resemble a 1950s Tokyo streetscape, featuring ramen shops representing all different parts of Japan. Awesome, right? Check this out: http://www.bento.com/phgal3.ht...

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