VIDEO: Three Arrested for Selling Lemonade on 'Lemonade Freedom Day'

lemonadestand.jpg
Flickr user pink.polka

An effort to sell ice-cold lemonade turned sour on Saturday afternoon when officers showed up not with dimes and nickels, but with handcuffs. 

Meg McLain, Will Duffield and Katherine Dill were arrested for running a lemonade stand on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol. The three were protesting as part of Lemonade Freedom Day, created by dad/activist Robert Fernandes in response to the recent string of children's lemonade stands that have been shut down by local police for not having the proper permits. (See a handy map of restrictions on kid-run concession stands here.)  

On his website, LemonadeFreedom.com, Fernandes encouraged people across America to launch or patronize lemonade stands to "declare their lemonade independence." 

The site reads:     

There are so many laws on the books that have been written to supposedly protect the children. Are these laws really helping them? Or are they hurting them? Do we want to send the children a message that they cannot be productive members of society? 

As police approached the D.C. lemonade stand, protesters shouted, "Come liberate your lemons!" and "Selling lemonade is not a crime!" A video shows officers searching the sellers before handcuffing them and taking them into custody. U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Kimberly Schneider told Fox News that the protestors were not arrested for "selling lemonade" but for "failure to obey a police officer, unlawful conduct [and] vending without a permit."



Not everyone believes protesting is the best way to teach kids to be productive members of society. Writes columnist Esther Cepeda: "Those who actually care about preparing the next generation to become profitable businesspeople should take their favorite youngster down to city hall to jump through the necessary hoops and learn what it really takes to become a successful entrepreneur."

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9 comments
lemonade diet
lemonade diet

Who knew that a little lemon held so many health benefits? Studies have shown that

water with lemon helps to eliminate toxins from the body, stimulates a sluggish

digestive system when drunk in the morning, balances blood sugars, balances the pH of

the body, prevents constipation and cures heartburn. Besides all that, water with

lemon is a good source of Vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant!

Tsmonica1222
Tsmonica1222

its one thing to get in trouble to sell lemonde on your own property but to deliberatly go sell lemonade somewhere where u know its against the law is another, i think they was very stupid in doing what they did and didnt think this out to well they only showed ignorance of being protestors without a purpose... They broke the law on purpose and their actions can not be justified in no way... To me they only set an example of people to rob and kill just to see if they can get away with it knowing its against the law... They should of used a different approach in their cause...

Mokaman1
Mokaman1

I guess it's hard to imagine, but Is it possible that someone could get sick from some type of contaminated lemonade? Overall, laws exist and are enforced because some group of legislators believes they are protecting people from something. Certainly there are exceptions to that.

Arthur Kinney
Arthur Kinney

So why is it that the police can incite violence then respond with violence?

Dave Lieberman
Dave Lieberman

Yes, because we want our seven-year-old sons and daughters to become depressed and demoralized by the number of hoops they have to go through to make and sell five bucks' worth of lemonade.

At the risk of sounding like, well, pretty much every Orange County stereotype, at some point personal responsibility ("those kids have grubby hands so I don't think I want their lemonade") needs to be included in the food safety rules.

Evan Edwards
Evan Edwards

Yep.  People can get sick from drinking lemonade sold by kids.  It happens.

So now we have to decide if we suppress all such dangers (prohibiting running in parks, playing basketball in cul-de-sacs, etc) as we have been, or if it's okay to have a little responsible danger in exchange for being able to do things like having kids play with their neighbors (which is what a lemonade stand really is), or run on grass in parks or play basketball on a low traffic street.

Either way can be argued for.  It's just that the people who want to be safe can avoid those activities, whereas if they are encoded in law, then the people who want their kids to engage in those activities or get a big grin from the kid down the street by paying a dollar for a 50 cent cup of lemonade can not legally do so.  My wife loves watching kids make change and discuss math with them.

By the way, you don't have to drink the lemonade, even if you do buy it.  Same thing for girl scout cookies... I always buy them when the girls are out in public, but the boxes usually go to work with my wife who gives them away to fellow faculty.

MikeHu
MikeHu

Yep, nothing says entrepreneurship like learning how to "ump through the necessary hoops."  "You there, you're not getting anywhere without that Form 1065EZ filled out in triplicate without the correct endorsements and signed riders. Come back in a week."

dragger x
dragger x

You're right, those cops sure need to get new jobs. They're not cut out to be officers.

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