A & J Drive-In, Burger Spot on the Blacktop, Continues to Deliver in Fullerton

A&Js Fullerton.jpg

If I'm ever pulling into a lonely asphalt lot greased with diesel, oil and debris, it's probably for one of the best burgers in Fuller-town. On a breezy summer afternoon, A & J's Burger Drive-In is a hive of lunchtime activity, and I've been buying their cheaply priced and consistently tasty burgers since attending Sunny Hills High School.
My friend and I used to visit for their cheap burgers and perfect fries, and it hasn't changed since. Lightly crisped buns smeared with Thousand Island dressing hold your burger together, and it goes well with finger-thick fries. For meatier flavors, try the pastrami burger with chili cheese fries. The pastrami's worth a go, too: not too dry, not too peppery, worth it.



This joint is sandwiched (burgered, actually, haha) between a thrift store and an old donut shop, and the three make for a sketchy triumvirate of the Fullerton barrio. Usually, you'll stumble into local workers who know where it's at for lunch. Sometimes it'll be a hungry, pubescent Korean kid from nearby Grace Community Church (which occupies the expanse that was once the Hunts-Wesson tomato cannery), five-dollar bill in hand. If you find neither of the two aforementioned demographics during your visit, chances are you've got two outdoor tables' worth of prime Brookhurst expanse all to yourself. Stretch your legs and enjoy the burger, (booze brought in surreptitiously by eaters--not that I know anything about that...), breeze and billboards on the panels of cruising trucks.

For a meal that's less than five bucks with a bit of street scenery, A & J's is worth visiting more than occasionally. But the best part is that if you get to know the employees well enough, they might let you cook up your own recipes for them, like the Burgeritto: lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, mayo, and diced patty in a tortilla layered with cheese.

 A & J's Burger Drive In, 

403 S. Brookhurst Rd.,
 Fullerton, (714) 525-1548.

Follow Stick a Fork In It on Twitter @ocweeklyfood or on Facebook.


Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
3 comments
Jessica Hugar
Jessica Hugar

I'm glad that you enjoy the food at A&J's, however, as a member of the community in which this  "Burger Drive-In" resides, I have a few comments regarding how you refer to the restaurant itself as well as the surrounding community it resides in.  First of all, I question why you refer to Fullerton as "Fuller-town". A town is, as described by the Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, "A compactly settled area usually larger than a village but smaller than a city." According to Wikipedia and the Fullerton City Hall Census of 2010, the population of Fullerton is 135,161 persons, therefore qualifying as a City, not a town. I've lived in Fullerton for approximately 85% of my life; Attending Elementary school in Fullerton as well as Fullerton High School and Fullerton College. Not once have I ever heard this City referred to as "Fuller-town". Seeing that you've ignored the actual statistics of Fullerton, I assume this to be a slight on this particular area of Fullerton. Making a joke about this restaurant being, "Sandwiched (burgered, actually, haha) between a thrift store and an old donut shop, and the three make for a sketchy triumvirate of the Fullerton barrio.", is absolutely offensive on many levels.  The area in which A&J's, The Donut Shop "Sweet-O Donuts" (Of which I am friends with the owners and have been for many years -- Very kind and extremely generous people who know my family and have made specialty doughnuts  for my father who recently had spinal surgery), and the Thrift Store is in NO way a "Barrio".  Again, according to the  Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, a "Barrio" is defined as, "A Spanish-speaking quarter or neighborhood in a city or town in the United States especially in the Southwest."   Yes, there are many people of Hispanic descent living in this area but I find it particularly funny that you describe the area as a "Barrio" considering that the owners of the Thrift Store and the Doughnut Shop are of Asian descent, and also in the next sentence you describe one of the regular customers as, "A hungry, pubescent Korean kid from nearby Grace Community Church."  (By the way, it was the HUNT-Wesson Cannery and Corporate Offices, then the Con-Agra Offices before becoming the Grace Community Church.) In my personal opinion, "If you find neither of the two aforementioned demographics during your visit", You're a racially blind. Many people in this Neighborhood have enjoyed the food that A&J's have provided over many years, regardless of race, color or creed. Adding the ambiguous and cryptic line, "(booze brought in surreptitiously by eaters--not that I know anything about that...)" degrades the community in which A&J's resides. The surrounding area is full of hard-working, middle class homes. That text alone insinuates that the community is not lacking in the derelict. In my mind and that of friends and family that live in the area surrounding A&J's, the only paragraph in your description that was accurate was your last:  "For a meal that's less than five bucks with a bit of street scenery, A & J's is worth visiting more than occasionally. But the best part is that if you get to know the employees well enough, they might let you cook up your own recipes for them, like the Burgeritto: lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, mayo, and diced patty in a tortilla layered with cheese." Next time, I suggest you do a bit more research before making assumptions about the community not only surrounding the restaurant, but a more accurate poll of those who are not from the 'barrio', derelict, or "surreptitiously" bringing booze with them to enjoy their meals.

Elena Kim
Elena Kim

Try their fried mushrooms. I started liking mushrooms after I've tried them at A&J's

MikeHu
MikeHu

I may have a hard time detouring from Okazya, but thanks for the tip.

Now Trending

Around The Web

From the Vault

 

Loading...