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Immigrant Cattle Doing the Jobs American Cattle Won't Do

Categories: Really?!?!?
mozambiquecattleflickrilri.jpg
Flickr user ILRI
Cattle from Mozambique--how many more immigrant cattle will come?
 
Earlier this week, Foreign Policy published a somewhat tongue-in-cheek essay in which the author argued that the United States treats foreign cattle better than it does immigrants. According to the piece, the United States imported more than two million cattle last year, and the government did everything possible to make it even easier to bring in more bovines.

It's the great American immigration story, people: These invaders are doing the jobs American cattle won't do.

Out of KBTX-TV in College Station, Texas (home to Texas A & M, whose Department of Animal Science has one of the top beef cattle programs in the country), comes a story that American cattle stock is at its lowest in 50 years, and that the number of calves born is at its lowest number in 60 years. And because American cattle and their descendants are becoming so lazy, beef watchers say the price of beef will increase to record highs this year.

How long until hamburger eaters begin blaming immigrant cattle instead of directing their ire at the American working-cow class?
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11 comments
Mitchell Young
Mitchell Young

Without even reading the article I know its one of the typical brain dead, CFR type pieces praising immigration. Well, here's the difference between cattle and people (besides the slight IQ advantage cattle have over our typical immigrants).

1) Cattle don't vote2) Cattle don't have 3 kids (average) that require 11 years of public 'education'3) Cattle stay on the cattle owner's land4) No own ever had to wait for 'oprima el dos para vaca-es'5) brown cattle don't have 4.5 times the teen birthrate as white cattle6) we don't build multi-million dollar 'arts' high schools in LA for the children of cattle

Seriously, though, where did these guys at CFR earn their political economy. Importing people has externalities an order of magnitude great than those of cattle.

Jckoster0915
Jckoster0915

unless your name is dancing in the pond, or wind under my balls.  you are also an immigrant.  hell this whole country was taken stolen from their originals inhabitants by immigrants... keep that in mind..... if you are talking about immigratios laws lets start by giving the native americans at least 50% of everything we took from them....

gustavoarellano
gustavoarellano

Another classic bullshit rant by Mitchell!

Mitchell Young
Mitchell Young

I know you are a busy man, but 'Bullshit' isn't a rational argument.

gustavoarellano
gustavoarellano

But that's all your infantile brain can understand—hence, the brevity.

JIM
JIM

The problem is feed lots. If the cattle are kept in a fenced in feed lot with many others instead of a pasture, they move from feeder A to feeder B and are not walking around and grazing in a pasture. If you spent your day sitting in chairs, how lazy would you be? It is the same thing here. Same thing happens in feedlots elsewhere, not just in the U.S..

Cody Williams
Cody Williams

I hate it when writers say conflicting things.. at first he says American imports then he changes to US imports... geez.... When are journalists going to learn that America is 35 separate countries? Changes the story meaning quite abit when you change the market of which you speaking about.

kal
kal

false. but apparently as you enjoy pointless criticism and corrections, both are referred to as 'America' however for understanding purposes, 'The Americas' is the term you're looking for as 'America' is most often reserved for the United States. thanks for playing.

Masswohlj
Masswohlj

While I understand the point the Foreign Policy essay is trying to make, I would also highlight that the US government has also expended considerable effort over the years to place restrictions on importations of foreign cattle. The US government has shown itself perfectly willing to implement protectionist objectives of some US cattle producers even if it means violating international trade obligations to do so. Currently, Canada and Mexico are pursuing a formal dispute at the World Trade Organization over a US law that requires meat processed in the United States to be labeled with the country where the cattle were born. That law, known as COOL, has caused foreign born cattle to be devalued in the US market place in order to compensate US buyers for the added cost of segregating them from US cattle.

So, while I'm sure human immigrants have legitimate concerns, the grass in the cattle pasture may not be as green as the FP essay would have it appear.

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