SoCal White Collar Crook Wins Federal Prison Trip

DanielClydeHunterCrook.jpg
Hunter: Served his OC church and charity but had a dark side
From a distance, Orange County's Daniel Clyde Hunter III seemed to be a superbly decent person.

Hunter's history includes: successful businessman, church bishop, sports enthusiast, college student body president, loving older brother of nine siblings, contributor to the Southern California Special Olympics as well as beloved husband and father of six good kids.

But, sadly, despite those impressive facts, Hunter was also a greedy criminal, who concocted and then executed a multi-year plot to steal millions of dollars from innocent investors while guaranteeing 30 percent annual returns for his proposed Clearwater Waterpark Development.

That assertion isn't a guess. After federal agents arrested him in 2013, Hunter eventually admitted the truth. He'd funneled investor funds away from the business project and into his own pocket to bolster his lifestyle.

Nowadays, the defendant asserts he "regrets" his cheating.

Hunter's defense lawyer sought a soft punishment because, he claimed, his 67-year-old client "led an exemplary life" and suffers medical woes.

Assistant United States Attorney Ann Luotto Wolf argued the crimes required a 33-month prison trip in accordance with federal sentencing guidelines.

This week inside the Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse in Santa Ana, U.S. District Court Judge Andrew J. Guilford determined the appropriate punishment is a term of 30 months, $922,500 in restitution and, when the defendant emerges from custody, supervised probation for five years.

Hunter must self-surrender to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons by noon on April 11.

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Email: rscottmoxley@ocweekly.com. Twitter: @RScottMoxley.

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4 comments
tuidi
tuidi

Yet another Mormon leader gets convicted of fraud. One Mormon minor general authority sits in federal prison for fraud, and many stake presidents and bishops. Utah is the nations leader for affinity fraud. Yet within the church itself, prison time or no, the person normally escapes punishment. One of those convicted in the Bonneville Pacific fraud case in the mid-/late-90s kept his temple recommend while in prison, became a Mormon leader again right after his release, and then became a professor at BYU-Hawaii.



Don't do business with Latter-day Saints. So easy to lose your shirt.

tuidi
tuidi

Yet another Mormon leader gets convicted of fraud. One Mormon minor general authority sits in federal prison. Utah is the nations leader for affinity fraud. Yet within the church itself, prison time or no, the person normally escapes punishment. One of those convicted in the Bonneville Pacific fraud case in the mid-/late-90s kept his temple recommend while in prison, became a Mormon leader again right after his release, and then became a professor at BYU-Hawaii.



Don't do business with Latter-day Saints. So easy to lose your shirt.

20ftjesus
20ftjesus topcommenter

How do people fall for this stuff?  Thirty percent returns!!!  


At the pool the other day, I listened surreptitiously to a very well-known businessman try to sell my neighbor a crazy real estate scam with 15% returns.  It's all a con game. 

FishWithoutBicycle
FishWithoutBicycle

@20ftjesus 

I despise folks who swindle innocent people out of their money...but isn't it the investor's responsibility to make sure the investment is legit?

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