How I Found Out About the Lost Mexicans of the Bastanchury Ranch

bastanchury_ranch.jpg
If you don't already know, I'll just say it here: we at the Weekly love to tell the hidden history of Orange County, those stories that never made it into the master narrative, whether it's its about the Brotherhood of Eternal Love, the Orange County chapter of the Black Panther Party, the Great Flood of 1938, OC's Gabrieleños, or any number of Mexican pioneers. We find these gems just like any other gems: by working our asses off. But I want to take a moment to discuss how I found out about my cover story this week, about a community of hundreds of legal Mexican immigrants and their American-born children that lived on Fullerton's Bastanchury Ranch who were unceremoniously deported 80 years ago last month. It's a tale of footnotes, microfilm, reportorial stupidity, and sheer will that any college student or aspiring writer should read and follow closely.

I first heard about the Bastanchury Mexicans in 2003, after reading an article in the Orange County Register about how then-State Senator Joe Dunn was trying to get an apology passed in the California State Legislature for Mexican-Americans repatriated during the 1930s. The Reg only had a throwaway mention, one that immediately piqued my interest. How could a whole community of Mexicans just get tossed out--and why would the Reg just sum it up in half a sentence?

It wasn't just the paper, though: they got the info from Decade of Betrayal: Mexican Repatriation in the 1930s, a 1995 book by Francisco Balderrama and Raymond Rodríguez documenting the episode. There, they gave two sentences to the episode--that's it. And these guys are the authorities on the subject--and if they couldn't dig up more facts, I assumed, no one could.

The Bastanchury Mexicans story stuck with me over the next decade, as I tackled other Gunkist memories. I did discover that Gilbert Gonzalez' magisterial Labor and Community: Mexican Citrus Worker Villages in a Southern California County, 1900-1950 had a little bit more on the subject, but not much. Then in 2010, after the Weekly hosted a seminar on the Alex Bernal civil rights case, a man went up to me and, unprovoked, told me he was born on the Bastanchury Ranch. WTF? I excitedly jotted down his information...and summarily lost it. I couldn't even remember the man's name, and the story became a Moby Dick for me, one I would frequently bemoan to colleagues.

bastanchury_ranch_mexicans.jpg
Some of the Mexicans of the Bastanchury Ranch

Flash-forward to three weeks ago. I have a feature hole to fill. I figured it was time to tackle my Moby Dick--why the hell not? With no info whatsoever? I got in contact with Fullerton intellectual-around-town Jesse La Tour, who I knew had found oral histories mentioning the Bastanchury Ranch. He hooked me up with them, and the story slowly starts unfolding. I realized I had enough for a feature, but still didn't have two crucial details: someone who was alive when the mass deportation happened, and the date of said deportation. So right at the end of my latest "Gustavo's Awesome Lecture Series!," I did something I never do: tip my hand on a story by publicly asking if anyone knew anyone born on the Ranch, to contact me.

A man came up to me. "That guy at the back of the room? He might know someone." The man's name was Bobby Melendez, and he's the gentleman who introduced me to Cuca Morales, the Fullerton resident born on the Ranch who plays a key part of my story.

But I still couldn't find the date. The fine ladies at the Fullerton Public Library brought out all their Bastanchury materials--nothing. They let me go through the microfilm of the Fullerton News Tribune, which I spent five hours on one day--nothing. By now, I had to write my story--deadlines. But the date bugged me--I knew it was somewhere in the microfilm, hidden. So just last Thursday, I returned to the Library, determined to find it--and finally did! I'd show ustedes the clipping, but the Register owns the copyright, and they don't much like me right now. It confirmed everything I had read from the oral histories--the nine trainloads of Mexicans, the tears, the castigating of the Bastanchury Mexicans as welfare cases. And, with date in hand, I was able to find more info by matching it with other local newspapers.

Moral of the story, kiddies? Research--research, research, research. Never stop. Follow your hunches. Never lose the contact info for sources. And never forget.

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27 comments
John.Ehrlichman
John.Ehrlichman

@Gustavo-I may not always agree with you, but you do OC a tremendous service.  Most people are completely ignorant of OC history.  Well done.

NGCoot
NGCoot

@GA - Where can I get good nopalitos con puerco verde?

Carmen Cesena
Carmen Cesena

My mother's family lived in the path of the San Francisquito Damn, which flooded the Piru/Fillmore area where thousands of farmworker's families were drowned. One of my great uncles, Juan Carrillo lost his wife and 8 children that night. This history has been only partially documented.

Efren Rodriguez
Efren Rodriguez

Yes, I know of this. Operation wetback followed. American-Mexicans being deported to a foreign country. Many people find out about this until they hit a unversity .

JGlanton
JGlanton topcommenter

Sad story.  They should have been ceremoniously deported.  Then there would have been justice. 

Earl Marty Price
Earl Marty Price

Yes, that and the other pat of Orange County history, the melendez family which Chancellor Manuel Gonzales had honored at UCI. Their case was the basis fro Marshall's challenge that effectively made school segregation illegal

Jerry Vazquez
Jerry Vazquez

Thanks for sharing Gustavo I'm Sharing this.

grvz5247
grvz5247

Great story Gustavo, Thanks for sharing.

Laura Bahena
Laura Bahena

Thanks for sharing, it's easy to forget some of the past struggles

Earl Marty Price
Earl Marty Price

/Wasn't there a lynhing on or about Irvine Ranch in the late 20's of two Mexican famer workers too. We learned about this during a clas at Irvine during the early 70's

Billy Bouskill
Billy Bouskill

All the homies from Fullerton Tokers Town...Qvole!

Jesus D. Carrillo
Jesus D. Carrillo

Heard about the flood of 1938 from my parents. How about the deportation of Japanese Americans? They told me stories about that too.

Eddie_Patino
Eddie_Patino

Awesome Story Gustavo! I was fortunate enough to have Jesse La Tour as my english professor this semester. He really opened up an intrest in me on local issues that I can not seem to get enough of.

GustavoArellano
GustavoArellano moderator editortopcommenter

@JGlanton Actually, they shouldn't have been deported, period—but nice to see your true colors!

Mitchell_Young
Mitchell_Young topcommenter

@Earl Marty Price California's NAEP scores are now at the level of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Washington DC. So I guess 'desegregation' worked.

Mitchell_Young
Mitchell_Young topcommenter

@Earl Marty Price You can bet if there was, Klavito would have found it.

Mitchell_Young
Mitchell_Young topcommenter

@Jesus D. Carrillo Uh, what 'deportations' of Japanese Americans?  

There were quite a few Japanese (not Americans, just Japanese who happened to live in America) who self-deported as war approached.

JGlanton
JGlanton topcommenter

@GustavoArellano @JGlanton  Heh, we certainly see yours in every example of yellow journalism at OCWeekly. The only color you can possibly derive from my comment is that I believe that people should be held to follow the laws. If you don't like that, work to change the laws. Because a story makes you sad or seems unfair, doesn't make it legal.

Mitchell_Young
Mitchell_Young topcommenter

@GustavoArellano @JGlanton Why not? 

Even back then the US had immigration laws. Pretty much anyone from the Western Hemisphere could move to the US, but they had to do so at a valid entry point, and they had to  have a job and not be likely to be a public charge. Having lost their places in the semi-feudal system that Bastanchury set up, the employees were subject to deportation. I have no doubt that the 'citizens' deported were mostly minor children. 

BTW, at least Bastanshury's ranch didn't push the costs of his cheap labor unto all of us. In Econ 101 terms, he internalized his costs. Today, cheap labor lobby externalizes the costs, what with all the 'free' education and school breakfasts and lunches and WIC we provide to immigrant headed households.

GustavoArellano
GustavoArellano moderator editortopcommenter

@JGlanton Took the bait, and we now have a new pendejo to add to Mitchie's legions of idiots!

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