LAPD Chief Charlie Beck Puts His Officers and Victims in Orange County First and Foremost

Categories: 2013 Homicides
Thumbnail image for Chris Dorner LAPD.jpg
Dorner
Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck held a wide-ranging press conference this morning on the Christopher Jordan Dorner case, which plunged Southern California into a nightmare after the former La Palma resident is believed to have killed an Irvine couple out of revenge before taking the lives of two more law enforcement officers and then his own a week ago today.

Besides updating a media on where his department stands a week after Dorner's fiery end, Beck wanted to introduce Phil and Emada Tingirides, a captain and sergeant in the chief's department respectively who were confined with their blended family of six children in their Irvine home while the suspect was on the loose. See:

Christopher Dorner Nightmare Relived by LAPD Couple of Irvine Phil and Emada Tingirides

Chief-Charlie-Beck_LAPD.jpg
LAPD
Chief Charlie Beck
But before getting to the couple, who Beck labeled as "heroes," he covered several Dorner-related topics on his own or after being prompted by questions from reporters:

The LAPD family: Beck wanted the media and public to know the toll the Dorner case took not only on his officers but their spouses and children. He mentioned his own kids went to school in Walnut with Monica Quan, the daughter of retired LAPD Capt. Randy Quan gunned down with her fiance Keith Lawrence in their Irvine condo complex. "She was a wonderful kid," Beck said of Quan and he noted her life with Lawrence was "just beginning." The chief mentioned the human toll was also being felt by families of officers in Riverside, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department and more than 50 people who were under LAPD protection. "Our investigation revealed Dorner certainly did his homework" [on LAPD families], Beck said. ". . . He wanted to harm the families of those he felt wronged him." Riverside cop Michael Crain was laid to rest last Thursday, and the memorial service for Sheriff's Deputy Jeremiah McKay is this Thursday. Beck also mentioned the two officers from the LAPD Newton Division who were wounded by gunfire as well as a second San Bernardino County deputy who will relive the nightmare for years to come as he undergoes various surgeries. "Yes, we are police officers, yes we sign up for some risk," Beck said, "but our families do not sign up for that, our kids do not sign up for that." He said his department is offering psychological services to officers and their families, "especially so kids can have some sense of normalcy, some sense of security. They'll be impacted by this forever." This includes past LAPD families like Quan's.

The Dorner manifesto: Beck said a special, independent investigator he hired as been "working nonstop the past three days" reviewing Dorner's wrongful termination complaints and allegations of LAPD racism. Once completed, the review be passed along to the department's inspector general, who will make the findings public and allow public comments before the matter goes to the police commission for more study and public comment. The entire process may take up to a year, Beck said. "This Los Angeles Police Department will do right by this," Beck vowed. Asked why, he explained he and other chiefs before him worked very hard to buff up the tarnished reputation of LAPD and, for him personally, especially race relations. "I want to make sure we address his concerns that have become so public in a public way." It just as important to reassure his own officers as it is the public that racism is a thing of the past in his 13,000-member agency, he said. But he also conceded some will stick to their criticism no matter what the Dorner investigation turns up. He said he does not want to prejudice the review and looks forward to what comes of it. Beck added all commanders have been instructed to talk with officers about the disciplinary process, race issues, how to file complaints and more. "Just like the public, they have to have faith in the Los Angeles Police Department," he said of his officers. "And the police department has to have faith in the disciplinary system."


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4 comments
18usc241
18usc241 topcommenter

LA and Orange County law enforcement leadership don't give a damn about their officers on the street since I've seen them abuse their officer's trust ad infinitum. And if any of them object, you turn on them in a New York minute (research Serpico - NYC 70's). Same old cover up - different sociopath leaders. 

All you care about is your "Orange County house wife" lifestyle (courtesy a 6 figure salary) and the associated ass kissing that come with your positions. 

Signed,  

World's leading expert on OC law enforcement leadership's corruption and criminality.



Anonymous
Anonymous

How many SWAT, SBSD, & other law enforcement was surrounding the cabin?  All them against one guy who was cornered and all the could come up with was burn the cabin down?   They can't even get their story straight. They had NO intentions of taking Dorner alive. They wanted this man dead. All the conflicting BS, media blackout leads to one thing.......they definitely have something to hide.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yep,Charlie Beck hired an independent investigator to review Dorner's wrongful termination. The outcome will be no different then before.....since its safe to assume this person is connected with LAPD.

18usc241
18usc241 topcommenter

Update: 02/25/13

RT story quotes: 

LAPD illegally sold police guns, claims veteran officer. A longtime member of the Los Angeles Police Department is suing the LAPD because he says other officer retaliated against him after he blew the whistle on an illegal gun-selling ring within the force. 

The retaliation against plaintiff intensified. Plaintiff was ostracized, his reputation damaged, and [was] told to 'watch his back,' among other retaliatory acts,” the lawsuit claims.

"Certainly this is something that we are going to guard against in the future," Police Chief Charlie Beck told an ABC affiliate. "At the very least department guidelines will be restructured so this doesn't happen again."

But Perez said the only things that changed were his colleagues retaliated at him worse.

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If you don't protect your police officer's doing the right thing YOU DON'T CARE ABOUT ANY OF THEM. Not even the bad one's. 



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