Undocumented Artist Julio Salgado Spoofs Controversial American Apparel Ad

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Julio Salgado
Controversy is swirling around an ad produced by the infamously edgy American Apparel last summer which paired two models under the banner of diversity. As Colorlines writer Jorge Rivas noted, comedian Fahim Anwar tweeted the ad on May 19 showing a white woman together with a Latino man. The ad's caption says "Robin a USC student, studying Public Relations, with Raul, a California farmer in Denim and Chambray" as reactions to the image came in swiftly.

Julio Salgado, former editorial cartoonist for Cal State Long Beach's Daily 49er and current co-founder of Dreamers Adrift says he found the image unrealistic to say the least. "My initial reaction was "Really?!" in a Tina Fey and Seth Meyers voice," he says, noting how "Raul" was being used as a prop and how overall unrealistic the portrayal was. "When I worked construction work with day laborers that looked just like that man, women who looked like that hipster girl would usually keep on walking."
Robin a USC student, studying Public Relations, with Raul, a California farmer in Denim and Chambray

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/1cwyHRobin a USC student, studying Public Relations, with Raul, a California farmer in Denim and Chambray

Robin a USC student, studying Public Relations, with Raul, a California farmer in Denim and Chambray

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/1cwyH)

Robin a USC student, studying Public Relations, with Raul, a California farmer in Denim and Chambray

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/1cwyH),,m


Salgado, who our Mexican-in-Chief recently gave a shout out to in his Long Beach City College commencement speech and who lent his talents (and a shtup story) to our infernal rag's 2012 sex issue, decided to utilize his artistic sensibilities to create a bitingly critical 'Undocumented Apparel' series spoofing the ad in question while broadening its horizons as a space for self-determination.

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Julio Salgado

"At first, the images were a reaction to the American Apparel ad, but as I keep making them, they have sort of become my way to pay homage to the many undocumented folks I personally know," says the activist and artist now based in Berkeley. "If the quotes seemed confrontational, that is totally on purpose." A baffled American Apparel spokesperson went on record with The Bay Citizen characterizing the controversy as "contrived."

"I want to use my art to call out the folks that are playing politics with us and not be afraid to do so," Salgado adds. With that, do yourselves a favor and check out the frequently updated series. There you'll find powerful messages from a voice trying to turn an upside down world right side up.

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