Warren G Reflects on His Classic Regulate...G Funk Era Album 20 Years Later

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Marv Watson
Mr. Warren G on the board
West Coast hip-hop seemed as invincible as ever when rapper/producer Warren G dropped Regulate...G Funk Era 20 years ago. Released on June 7, 1994, the debut album tapped into the strength of Dr. Dre's The Chronic and Snoop Doggy Dogg's Doggystyle that came before it while offering something distinctive along its path as a hip-hop classic. "Regulators! Mount up!" the title track called out before Warren G and Nate Dogg slickly traded rhymes with perfection over a smooth sample of "I Keep Forgetting" by Michael McDonald.

"Regulate" soared all the way up to No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 list propelling the album to triple platinum status. Although the smash single detailed the gritty side of Long Beach, Warren G perfected a good times G-funk vibe throughout the album, especially with the reminiscing rhymes of "This DJ" and its eternally quotable chorus. Regulate...G Funk Era netted two Grammy nominations in creating a simply defined soundscape "where rhythm is life and life is rhythm."

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Femcee WBD Tells Tales of Survival on 'Hate Me' EP

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EYEKON
WBD: Hate only motivates
Rapper WBD invites all haters to hate on Hate Me, her latest EP. The Salvi spitfire makes sure they've got their work cut out for them. The Weekly first introduced the rhymer last year as OC's newest hip-hop outlaw when she relocated to Anaheim from LA. She came to town back then with her Words of the Wicked mixtape. WBD returns with Hate Me, a collection riding a hybrid sound of underground and Chicano Rap allowing for WBD to spin her stories of survival. The anguish is evident in her vocal inflections on the tone-setting opener "Heaven or Hell." Produced by Toks the Blue Loko, guest features on Hate Me are stocked with fellow femcees including impressive lyrical assists by Top Dime and D'Duchess.

After an album's worth of grappling with the harshness of life, WBD ends with a laid back bonus track expressing gratitude for every waking day. And if people can't kick down with that, hate can't depreciate what it's worth.

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Five Signs You Might Be a Shitty Rapper

Categories: Hip-Hop


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By: Kat Bein

Ever since dance music decided to overdose on molly, the only thing respectable alternative for pop music lovers is hip-hop.

With that said, we're sorry, hip-hop, but we have to start holding you to a higher standard. You don't want to end up like EDM, do you? Trust us, you don't.

Fix up, look sharp. You're pretty sloppy. So please, take a real hard, close, honest look at yourself. And if you're guilty of one of these five symptoms of wack-hackery, well, do the Gandhi and be the change you wish to see in the world. The future of music depends on you.


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West Coast Legend Ras Kass to Meet and Greet Fans in Orange

Categories: Hip-Hop

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Timothy Norris/ LA Weekly
Ras Kass, the west coast rapper behind hip-hop classics "Nature of the Threat" and "Interview With a Vampire," will be meeting and greeting fans tomorrow at DSTRTD Truth's headquarters in Orange!

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Womyn in Hip-Hop Puts Ladies First in Santa Ana

Categories: Hip-Hop

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Lucero Archuleta
Krudas Cubensi: Poderosxs!
It's been 25 years since Queen Latifah first rhymed, "The ladies will kick it the rhyme that is wicked / Those that don't know how to be pros get evicted!" on All Hail the Queen, her debut album. That very same "Ladies First" spirit lives on and thrives this Saturday in Santa Ana at an event called "Womyn in Hip-Hop," showcasing the talents of women in all elements of hip-hop culture.

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Is Riff Raff Serious?

Categories: Hip-Hop

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By: Jeff Weiss

Riff Raff's hair is a crop circle of braids. His eyes are blue, dilated and deserted. Gold grills glint on his teeth. A boy-band-thin beard zigzags across his face. His chest and neck double as a tattooed billboard for MTV, BET, the NBA, Bart Simpson and Seagram's Seven.
To complete the look, the Hollywood-based, 32-year-old white rapper wears a cherry-red, ruby-laced Icee (as in the frozen drink) chain around his neck. That's when he's not rocking the chain purchased by his label patron, Diplo, the Grammy-nominated DJ/producer and BlackBerry ambassador. Or the gilded, emerald-green chain that Soulja Boy bestowed upon him a couple of years ago during Riff Raff's brief stint on the Atlanta swag rapper's imprint. Over the summer, he released his sophomore album, Neon Icon, on Mad Decent.

Born Horst Christian Simco, Riff Raff was raised on Houston's racially diverse north side and possesses an accent so thick it seems clogged by codeine--more working-class twang than imitated patois. He's the logical spawn of white Texas rapper Paul Wall, but with a better sense of humor. Describing him in print is akin to trying to race piranhas on dry land. His bowl is the Internet, specifically YouTube, where his videos regularly register hundreds of thousands of views.


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Despot Still Wants to Be a Rich Drug Dealer

Categories: Hip-Hop





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On the afternoon of Friday, September 19, El-P decided to let off some steam in 140 characters or less. "this motherfucker @despotroast," the MC tweeted, referencing his friend and Queens, NY-bred, Brooklyn-based rapper Despot, "lives like 10 blocks away AND is driving and is still 42 minutes late. and THAT, kids, is where his album is."

 Despot -- a.k.a. Alec Reinstein -- protests the charges leveled against him. "First of all, El said 10 blocks. He don't live 10 blocks away from me. He lives like, pfft, 20 blocks away from me," Reinstein, 32, says of his current tour mate, speaking from Charlottesville, Va. "And he lives in a shitty-ass fucking part of Williamsburg where you can't park your fucking car 'cause all these dickheads got all the parking spots, and that's what happened. And I was still early!"

Dickheads and automobiles notwithstanding, he soon tries to explain why he actually ends up late so often. "I don't know why. It's 'cause I'm lazy. I don't want to do anything. I don't want to do most things. I was always late to school. Then, I just stopped going. I never really had a real job because I'm late for everything, and I just blame everything on everyone else, so yeah, that leads into the album. I don't have an album out because it's probably everybody's else fault, but I don't know why. It's definitely my fault. I'm lazy."




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Miss Char's Rap Skills Are 'Self Explanatory'

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Photo by KILLcREY
The Queen of Juice County
Miss Char excavates the depths of her soul knowing an unexamined life ain't worth rhyming about. With that, OC's top femcee debuts with Self Explanatory, an 8-song mixtape that only pads the 18-year-old rising rhymer's resume. The title is suggestive of the subject matter as the rapper literally seeks to explain herself. All throughout, Miss Char displays an old school experimental underground rhyme style, delivering dizzying truth sermons before relaxing into a hippie haze. This dynamic is most pronounced on "Wounded," an anti-materialistic anthem extolling the virtues of a spiritually-minded life. "It might seem like a mess, kid / Just watch what you digestin' / Might just go and spread the infection," she warns before going into a slinky chorus. The wisdom from the youngster shows potential and promise for years to come.

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Did Anonymous Force a Release Date for Lupe Fiasco's Tetsuo & Youth Album?

Categories: Hip-Hop

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Lupe Fiasco
Lupe Fiasco found himself in record label purgatory again. He went out on a preview tour for Tetsuo & Youth, his fifth studio album, last year. A couple of songs with music videos from the project dropped, but with no immediate album release date in sight. It felt like Lasers all over again. The Chicago-bred rapper complained that Atlantic Records held the project up because it didn't have a "pop" single.

That's when hacker group Anonymous stepped in this week threatening the label to give a release date or face severe consequences!

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La Coka Nostra's Hostile Hip-Hop Just Might Kill You

Categories: Hip-Hop

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When it comes to cocaine and pop culture, one blow-snorting icon towers above all. In 1983's Scarface, Al Pacino played the iconic Tony Montana, a merciless, rags-to-riches coke kingpin who (spoiler alert) goes out in a blaze of gunfire and blood. Hip-hop worships the character for his killer instinct: Nas named a song after Tony's motto of "The world is yours," and one prominent rapper even takes his name straight from the movie's title.

That said, La Coka Nostra weren't feeling the love in 2009. A Brand You Can Trust--the full-length debut from the hip-hop supergroup featuring members of House of Pain, Non Phixion, Limp Bizkit and Special Teamz--closes with a track called "Fuck Tony Montana." As an unhinged, ominous beat blasts in, Ill Bill's verse is the first fired: "Fuck Tony Montana/We kill kids/If he did, he'd still be alive." Goddamn.


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