Fleet Foxes Debut 'Grown Ocean' Video; Robin Pecknold Contextualizes 'Helplessness Blues'

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While you may scoff "adult-indie contemporary" at teh mention of Fleet Foxes, nothing on our radar has been more eagerly anticipated than the Seattle band's sophomore release, Helplessness Blues, out May 3. Now that they've released the first video from that set, singer Robin Pecknold talks about the making of the album. (You can also watch the video after the jump.)

Fleet Foxes - Grown Ocean from Fleet Foxes on Vimeo



  • On recording the music: Recording started with demos at a building in Seattle that's been multiple recording studios since the '70s, from Triangle, to Jon & Stu's, to Reciprocal Recording, to the Hall of Justice. A number of incredible albums have been made in that building over the years, including Bleach by Nirvana. So we were lucky enough to take over the lease when Death Cab for Cutie moved out in October 2009, and I started writing songs more seriously again.


  • Who were they inspired by when making Helplessness Blues? I think this music draws influence and inspiration from popular music and folk rock of the mid '60s to the early '70s, folks like Peter Paul & Mary, John Jacob Niles, Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Neil Young, CSN, Judee Sill, Ennio Morricone, West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, The Zombies, SMiLE-era Brian Wilson, Roy Harper, Van Morrison, John Fahey, Robbie Basho, The Trees Community, Duncan Browne, the Electric Prunes, Trees, Pete Seeger, and Sagittarius, among many others. I'd say it's a synthesis of folk rock, traditional folk, & psychedelic pop, with an emphasis on group vocal harmonies. Astral Weeks was a big inspiration on this album, if not always in sound then in approach. The raw emotion in Van Morrison's vocals and the trance-like nature of the arrangements were very inspiring for this album!


  • How is it different from their debut? Musically it leans on country music a little bit more, in the slide guitar of songs like "Grown Ocean" and "Bedouin Dress" or "Helplessness Blues." We used a number of new instruments including the 12-string guitar, the hammered dulcimer, zither, upright bass, wood flute, tympani, Moog synthesizer, the tamboura, the fiddle, the marxophone, clarinet, the music box, pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar, Tibetan singing bowls, vibraphone, along with more traditional band instrumentation.

  • Why the title? It's called Helplessness Blues for a number of reasons. One, it's kind of a funny title. Secondly, one of the prevailing themes of the album is the struggle between who you are and who you want to be or who you want to end up being, and how sometimes you are the only thing getting in the way of that. That idea shows up in a number of the songs.

 


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